City Infrastructure
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City Infrastructure

On March 20 the city presented the design for the upcoming First Street Pedestrian Project to the neighborhood at the Irish Cultural Center. I was there with This Could Be PHX and other community advocates. What we saw was actually more disappointing than expected. All the feedback they were given over the past four years since the Fillmore-McKinley portion was completed was ignored. Our expectations that this “updated” McKinley-Moreland design would reflect at least SOME of that feedback were completely let down. Instead we saw the exact same design that they presented five years ago. I don’t know about you, but we've learned new and better ways of doing things over the past five years. So why hasn't the City and its consultants included them in the updated design?

A few weeks ago, we asked for your opinions on our Facebook page: What's the worst thing about parking in Downtown Phoenix? You gave us various different responses, and were extremely helpful in understanding the community's perception of what it's like to park in Downtown Phoenix. Let's face it: Parking is a touchy subject that lies at the center of a clash of lifestyles. It's a complex issue, and we get that. As part of our exploration into the topic of parking, we'll attempt to understand and explain some of its many facets in future blog posts. We want to do this thoroughly and factually so that we (and hopefully you!) can fully understand the problems our city is facing.

Words like urban infill get thrown around a lot in conversations about Downtown Phoenix, and really any modern city for that matter. But what is urban infill? According to the Sustainable Cities Initiative, it's defined as: [quote style="default"]... new development that is sited on vacant or undeveloped land within an existing community, and that is enclosed by other types of development. The term 'urban infill' itself  implies that existing land is mostly built-out and what is being built is in effect 'filling in' the gaps. The term most commonly refers to building single-family homes in existing neighborhoods but may also be used to describe new development in commercial, office or mixed-use areas.[/quote] We like to think of urban infill projects as the missing puzzle pieces to a city's success. That missing puzzle piece helps to bring about more density, walkability, amenities, and healthy and lively lifestyles.